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Memory Care has become a popular buzzword in the retirement and skilled nursing industries with the rise of diseases like dementia and Alzheimer’s. While there is no cure for these diseases, there’s a lot we can do to help people living with these memory conditions  and their families cope with a new reality.


Here are a few steps you can take to ease a loved one’s or your transition to life with Alzheimer’s:


Simplicity is key.

People living with memory diseases  will have trouble following intricate conversations or concepts, which may lead to frustration or embarrassment on both sides of a conversation. Be patient, loving, and remember to focus on one conversation topic at a time.


Routine is important.

Change is disorienting, so as often as possible, stick to a routine and schedule. If a change in the routine is upcoming--like a doctor’s appointment--write it down and make a point to mention it each day leading up at the same time.


Make safety a priority.

A difficult part of transition is the realization that things which used to be second nature may in fact be hazards now--something that was once as easy as remembering to turn off the faucet or stove could become dangerous when forgotten. Pay attention to the small changes in behaviors and abilities and adjust your loved one’s life to reflect their lifestyle.


Avoid anger and arguments.

There will be moments when you feel like you’re talking to a stranger. Stay strong and try to calmly explain yourself in simple terms; remind your loved one who you are and that you are there to help them.


Keep making memories.

Don’t give up hope, especially on the hardest days. Keep listening to music, telling jokes, and sharing moments together.



Our Assisted Living and Skilled Nursing teams at The Chateau are  able to cater to those who need memory care. Because people living with dementia and Alzheimer’s are prone to be disoriented and stressed, studies have shown that communities should be quiet and predictable, without a lot of change or flash--our community works to  keep patients from becoming overwhelmed or stressed. We understand that transition can be difficult on all people involved. Our caring staff is here to guide you through the process.


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